What about the weather

WEATHER stations which allow accurate monitoring of wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, air temperature and relative humidity can help mine managers control dust.

Excessive exposure to dust can have detrimental effects on miners and neighbouring households.

Hazardous dusts such as crystalline silica, asbestos and iron oxides can cause a number of lung disorders and diseases.

Weather stations which allow accurate monitoring of wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, air temperature and relative humidity can help mine managers control dust.

A company that develops scientific tools for a range of industries has launched a new range of weather stations.

Spectrum’s weather stations allow miners to monitor, document and analyse a customised database on site-specific weather conditions.

Weather data is transferred via a software program to a computer, and can be used to direct production decisions and haul road watering applications.

Users can also select optional sensors that record soil moisture temperature.

The weather stations’ expanded wireless communications allow ‘drive-by’ data downloading up to 300 m away from the station, and real-time data monitoring up to 2 km away.

Open text-based protocol makes customised communication possible, and data is stored in non-volatile memory, so that multiple PC users can access the station.

John Morris Scientific

02 9417 8877

info@johnmorris.com.au

www.johnmorris.com.au