Tunnel specialists work on mine collapse

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Tunnelling specialists have been brought in to help rescue nine workers who have been trapped inside a Peru mine since Thursday.

According to The Guardian the trapped workers are receiving oxygen and liquids through a giant hose and are stuck 200 metres below ground.

The miners were working without authorisation in a mine that shut down in the early 1980s, and were trapped after an explosion they set off to dislodge ore triggered a partial collapse.

The nine workers are aged 22 to 59 and include a father and son, and so far remain uninjured.

According to AFP tunnel reinforcement specialists worked yesterday to reinforce shafts at the abandoned mine.

Rescuers have been using their hands and buckets to remove debris from the shaft.

Peru Minister of Energy and Mines Jorge Merino said the Government was working with local mining companies to share expertise and help rescue the workers.

"Peru and the state are in solidarity with the lives of these fellow citizens," he said.

"We are all together to rescue these nine lives."

According to The Guardian illegal mining is common in Peru and generates as much as £1.25bn a year.

Image: AFP

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