The top five mining stories last week

Rio operating in the Pilbara. Copyright © 2017 Rio Tinto

Stay on top of the most read articles on the Australian Mining website over the past week, including a machinery and technology alliance between Rio Tinto and Caterpillar in the Pilbara.

Caterpillar partners with Rio Tinto to automate Koodaideri

Caterpillar will supply machinery and autonomous technology for Rio Tinto’s Koodaideri iron ore project in the Pilbara, Western Australia.

The scope of the equipment includes 20 autonomous 793F trucks and four autonomous blast drills, in addition to automation technologies and enterprise systems. Read more…

***

BHP slapped with record lawsuit over Brazil dam collapse

BHP has been hit with the largest damages claim in British legal history through a group action lawsuit seeking $US5 billion ($7.2 billion) over the 2015 Fundão dam collapse in Brazil.

The full claim, filed at the High Court in Liverpool by SPG Law, seeks damages on behalf of 235,000 Brazilian claimants. Read more…

***

Coal miners reach deal with Aurizon over QLD rail access

Rail operator Aurizon has signed agreements with coal mining customers for a revised rail access deal via the Central Queensland Coal Network (CQCN).

The decision follows months of back-and-forth with the miners over Aurizon’s revenues from the operation of the CQCN. Read more… 

***

Fortescue revs up Cloudbreak autonomous truck program

Fortescue Metals Group’s ambition for a fully autonomous fleet of haul trucks is a step closer after the first Cat 789D trucks fitted with the technology started operating at Cloudbreak.

The company will roll out 38 autonomous trucks at the Pilbara site, a project that is part of a broader plan to convert 175 machines by mid next year. Read more…

***

Scientists make breakthrough discovery about ‘fool’s gold’

A team of German scientists has proven for the first time that the concentration of gold in the notorious ‘fool’s gold’ directly depends on the level of arsenic in the pyrite where the gold is encrusted.

To the untrained eye, pyrite is commonly mistaken for gold and is hence referred to as ‘fool’s gold’, but it isn’t entirely useless. Read more…

To keep up to date with Australian Mining, subscribe to our free email newsletters delivered straight to your inbox. Click here.