Satellite technology paves path for tomorrow

The Queensland Government has developed a satellite based technology that allows geologists to map the mines of tomorrow.

The Queensland Government has developed a satellite based technology that allows geologists to map the mines of tomorrow.

Mines and Energy Minister Geoff Wilson said the new technology was put to the test in one of the first major mapping upgrades in almost 30 years in resource-rich north west Queensland.

“This technology has the potential to unlock rich new sites for mineral and geothermal energy resources,” Wilson said.

62,000 square kilometres have already been remapped.

“Geologists from my department used cutting edge technology to map the rocks of the north west for explorers to tap into the region’s hidden mineral potential,” he said.

“They’ve already uncovered new areas for explorers who are keen to make their mark in mining. We’re talking about a new generation of geoscience data.

“There’s new high-tech geoscience data available, along with seismic surveys that have already revealed faults deep in the earth’s crust.

These faults provide pathways for deep fluids to penetrate to the surface and that spells resource potential.”

Wilson said age dating had helped define new areas with rocks equivalent in age to the Mt Isa group which hosts the giant Mt Isa and George Fisher deposits.

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