QRC welcomes DMAA ban

The Queensland Resources Council has welcomed the interim prohibition of DMAA , a stimulant often used on mine sites.

The Queensland Resources Council has welcomed the interim prohibition of DMAA , a stimulant often used on mine sites.
A decision by the Therapeutic Goods Association has announced plans to include DMAA, also known as Jack3d, on a list of prohibited substances including drugs such as heroin and ecstasy, the ABC reports.
The QRC explained that Jack3d is currently available and is being used by some miners to stay alert during long shift hours, adding that it has already been banned in a number of other countries.
The body-building supplement Jack3d, which contains a synthetic stimulant, has been banned at a Bowen Basin mine following reports workers were using it to stay awake.
"The Queensland Government will need to apply that ban at the state level, essentially preventing the sale of the product in this state," QRC chief Michael Roche said.
"We believe this is the appropriate action, just as we support action on other substances."
His statements come after the NSW Minerals Council made similar overtures in calling for stricter regulation on drugs so companies can crack down on their use in mines.
The Minerals Council told a NSW Parliament inquiry synthetic drugs needed to be regulated in a nation-wide approach.
It also said regulators needed to monitor manufacturers to ensure chemical changes did not result in workarounds where banned drugs became technically legal.
Last month a WA Health Department official and the Gypsy Joker gang were investigated by police over plans to tamper with urine tests and have gang members score mining jobs.
Synthetic cannabis is also in the firing line as the QRC seeks to make it illegal in Queensland.

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