Project looks to train unskilled for mining jobs

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The Wallarah 2 project north of Sydney will look to locals to fill 70 per cent of its mining jobs and will train many workers without any experience from scratch.

According to the Lakes Mail, Wallarah 2 general manager Kerry Heywood said a large portion of the project’s workforce would be ‘cleanskins,’ or workers with no previous experience in mining.

In touting the economic benefit of the proposal near Wyong, Heywood said a further 700 indirect jobs would be created on top of the mine’s 300-strong workforce.

"Importantly, these jobs will be well paid and provide opportunities for ongoing training and advancement which will give young people the opportunity to live and work on the Central Coast," he said.

According to the Lakes Mail Heywood said the NSW Government’s 2010 Coal Industry Profile reported wages for underground workers leveled at $115,000 in 2009.

"By contrast, Wyong had an average wage of $41,000 in 2009 and more than 38 per cent of employed locals commuted to other areas for work," he said.

The Wallarah 2 project is a proposal by Kores Australia, which is owned by the South Korean Government.

The mine’s development has long been opposed by locals, who fear the project will put the region’s water supply at risk.

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