Peak body warns on dire shortage of engineers

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Australia needs almost twice the engineers it currently has trained if it wants to keep construction projects across the nation going ahead, according to Engineers Australia.

In a submission to a senate inquiry into the engineering skills shortage EA said the lack of trained engineers in Australia urgently needed to be addressed.

According to AAP the peak body suggested skilled migration would have to play a role in solving the shortage and better Government planning was also needed.

"Even with Australian universities and TAFEs producing around 9,000 graduates annually, Australia is still unable to provide a reliable domestic solution to these key shortages," it said.

The organisation said the shortage of trained engineers was stopping projects from going ahead and costing millions in delays.

"Over the past six years, more than one in 20 engineering projects did not proceed due to problems recruiting and retaining suitable qualified engineers," it said.

EA said it was promoting its own initiatives to train more engineers but federal and state governments also needed to intervene.

It said a national registration system for engineers could help deploy workers to the regions they were needed the most.

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