Partnership to tackle skills shortage

A NEW partnership between Curtin University and the Chamber of Minerals and Energy (CME) will help to develop the capacity of the minerals and energy sector to respond to the critical skill shortage in the resources industry.

A NEW partnership between Curtin University and the Chamber of Minerals and Energy (CME) will help to develop the capacity of the minerals and energy sector to respond to the critical skill shortage in the resources industry.

A memorandum of understanding between Curtin and the CME was signed today to bolster the resolve of both in the development of educational and research programs that strengthen the Australian resource industry.

Professor Jeanette Hacket, Vice-Chancellor of Curtin emphasised Curtin’s commitment to developing mutually beneficial partnerships for the good of industry.

“Curtin already has partnerships with some of the leading players in the minerals and energy sector such as BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Woodside and Chevron, and we are very pleased to be able to add the Chamber of Minerals and Energy to this list,” Professor Hacket said.

“We are the largest provider of education in Australia for the mining industry and already have close to 900 students who are studying for degrees in mineral education, comprising both exploration and production areas.

“The co-operative relationship with the CME will have far reaching outcomes including expected increases in the quantity and quality of students to more readily meet the resource industry’s employment and research needs.”

This agreement also promises sustainable strategies for all minerals and energy related programs with the Western Australia School of Mines (WASM) being one of the main beneficiaries of this strategic partnership.

Professor Paul Dunn, Head of WASM, is excited by the partnership with the CME and explains the potential impact on the resources industry.

“The current resources boom offers an unprecedented opportunity for growth for universities in WA. Curtin is responding to this rare circumstance by recruiting internationally recognised academics to head education and research initiatives in core mining and energy disciplines, and this ties in very well with the $113 million resources and chemistry precinct being built at its Bentley campus,” Professor Dunn said.

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