NT miners pressure Government

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Mining companies have been on the front foot in the Northern Territory, warning against a proposed national park and fracking moratorium.

The NT Government is soon expected to declare a 12,300 square-kilometre national park at Limmen, drawing the ire of miners who say they have not been consulted.

According to The Australian Minerals Council of Australia NT division Peter Stewart said the Government had approved exploration in regions set to be covered by the national park.

He said establishing the park would be counter-productive to the time and money companies had spent exploring the region.

But the NT Government said companies applied for permits with "eyes wide open" and were aware of the risks.

The stoush comes at the same time as Canadian-based Petro Frontier warns against establishing a NT fracking ban.

Petro Fronteir president of operations Richard Parkes told the ABC fracking would be an integral part of the state’s petroleum industry.

"I think for the Northern Territory to have an onshore petroleum industry of any kind it will rely as it has in the past on fracking," he said.

He said petroleum in the NT was not the same as coal seam gas in eastern Australia and the potential resource was "worth a lot of money" if the industry was allowed to expand.

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