NSW women encouraged to find work in mining

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An information hub encouraging young women to get involved in the industry will feature at the Australian National Field Days exhibition near Orange this week.

Driven by the NSW Minerals Council, the hub is part of an industry-wide push to increase the number of underrepresented workers in the industry.

While female employment in mining is steadily on the rise, the industry remains a male-dominated field.

In a statement NSW Minerals Council CEO Sue-Ern Tan said jobs in the mining industry were financially rewarding.

“Miners are the highest paid workers in NSW and starting salaries are amongst the highest of all graduate positions,” she said.

She said she was keen to push for a higher rate of female participation in the industry.

“As a professional woman representing the NSW mining sector, I am personally keen to see more women taking on the challenge of what have been considered ‘non-traditional’ roles.”

Increasing the participation of female workers has been widely acknowledged by resource companies and bodies as an imperative to solving the skills shortage problem.

Drake International national audit manager Lyndall Patterson told Australian Mining more needed to be done to financially support young people entering the mining industry.

“Apprentices are not paid enough during their training, so there is little incentive for young people to enter into them, especially when unskilled mine positions offer so much,” she said.

Earlier this month the WA Government urged apprentices to stick with their training after new figures indicated four out of ten were dropping out.

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