NSW Government won’t identify CSG spots

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New South Wales minister for resources and energy Chris Hartcher has refused to detail where coal seam gas extraction might take place in NSW.

Hartcher told Macquarie Radio yesterday he could not guarantee that CSG operations would not take place at St Peters in Sydney’s inner west.

He also failed to rule out CSG operations in rural NSW.

“I am not going to say where coal seam gas extraction is or isn’t going to take place,” he said.

“[But] we are determined we will not see a repetition of what happened in Queensland here in NSW, which is why we’ve set into place a large number of measures to ensure we do get the balance right.”

Hartcher said CSG permits would not be issued if they threatened water quality or prime agricultural land.

He also backed the State’s regulation and approval process, and said no final decisions would be made on CSG until all evidence had been considered.

Earlier this month Hartcher made the NSW Government submission to the CSG State Parliamentary inquiry.

Hartcher said the submission sought to balance future economic growth in NSW with community and environmental interests.

He said with the right management resource industries could co-exist with agricultural production and environmental protection.

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