New Zealand prepares to mark Pike River anniversary

Normal
0

false
false
false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

This Saturday marks the one year anniversary of the Pike River mine disaster, which killed 29 miners.

A year on from the tragedy the remains of the workers have still not been found, and with the mine prepared for sale, the receivers say it may take years for them to be recovered – if at all.

The families of those killed will gather on Saturday to unveil a special memorial and attend a service at the local rugby ground.

More than 2500 people are expected to gather for the service that will end with a minute silence to remember the dead.

Australians Willie Joynson and Josh Ufer, both from Queensland, were among the victims at Pike River.

The Royal Commission into the tragedy continues to conduct hearings.

This week it was told by Pike River’s former inspector, Kevin Poynter, that Australian mine officials had a “much better picture of what’s happening underground”.

Poynter said Australian mine standards were higher and its inspectors were better supported than their counterparts in New Zealand.

New Zealand Prime Minister John Key will speak at the Saturday ceremony but will only read from the bible.

“We thought that was appropriate,” he said.

To keep up to date with Australian Mining, subscribe to our free email newsletters delivered straight to your inbox. Click here.