New crushing technology a potential game changer

IMP Technology has taken a prestigious engineering award for pioneering a new rock crushing system that’s set to change the game for the global mining and quarrying industries: The IMPTEC Super Fine Crusher.

Team leader and inventor Chris Kelsy, winner of four prestigious engineering awards and mastermind behind the winning project, has been lucky enough to celebrate his 81st birthday with another win together with his colleagues at IMP Technology, which received a Statewide Super Innovation in Resources Award.

Work on the project began over a decade ago when he designed and put together the first prototype at his South Australian property in McLaren Vale. With the help of other directors of their small company and SA mining and quarrying industry supporters, Kelsey took the project through several incarnations to arrive at a commercial version.

The technology was touted as a game changer, as it can effectively produce fine particles under dramatically reduced energy use.  With rock crushing using a massive 10 per cent of the world’s energy, IMP says the new invention is set to be a game changer for the industry globally.

IMP Technology managing director and CEO John Doherty said the team was passionately dedicated to the project and excited about the prospect of exporting their technology to the world.

“The crusher can crush materials of almost any hardness including zircon, quartz or garnet to name a few, in the range D50 of 5 microns, media free, in a wet or dry environment,” Doherty said.

“This makes it unique and highly desirable for industrial mineral industries across the globe.

“We’ve been working on this for years and there is a lot of interest from mining and quarrying companies here and overseas, but we’ve needed to be patient.”

The crusher has gone through a number of adaptations to be scaled up and tested in trials at Hallett Concrete in South Australia. Supporters of the project include the South Australian government’s Mining Industry Participation Office and several mining and quarrying companies operating in South Australia, who agree the technology is set to change the industry across the globe with huge implications on costs and productivity, if it proves successful in a commercial setting.

Kelsey said the team was working on another project which uses the IMPTEC Super Fine Crusher, and has already proved successful in demonstrating an optimum flow sheet for magnetite upgrading, achievable with only a single pass.