Most Aussies support mining

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Almost all Australians think the mining boom has been good for Australia but less than half say they’ve personally benefitted from the industry.

According to a Nielsen poll for The Australian Financial Review 85 per cent of voters think the mining boom is good for Australia, including 73 per cent of Greens.

But 52 per cent say they’ve not personally benefitted "at all" from the industry and 33 per cent say they’ve only benefitted "a little".

Only 12 per cent of respondents said they’d benefitted "a lot" from the mining boom.

The bulk of these respondents came from resources states Western Australia and Queensland.

Tasmanians and Victorians were least supportive of the industry.

The personal benefit of mining is one of the central arguments for and against the mining industry.

Industry representatives say a strong mining sector opens up job opportunities, boosts the income of workers, and supports local businesses.

They also say those outside the industry benefit indirectly through a strong economy and higher Government tax earnings.

Detractors of the mining industry, including left-leaning think tank The Australia Institute, argue the mining industry destroys more jobs in manufacturing and tourism than it creates.

They also argue the mining industry is predominantly foreign owned and most of its benefits flow to overseas investors.

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