More Hunter Valley housing needed for miners

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The amount of new housing built in the Upper Hunter Valley each year will need to double to keep pace with mining expansions in the region, according to the NSW Government.

The Government’s draft land use strategy for the region released this week said temporary accommodation would also need to rise to help house the expanding numbers of transient workers in the mining industry.

The Newcastle Herald reports the Government’s property developer Landcom has already been investigating developing property in the region.

Demand for permanent accommodation could rise from 360 dwellings a year to more than 700, and in the short term an extra 725 temporary rooms in hotels needed to be found.

The Government made the predictions based on a 60 per cent rise in mining production from the area.

The news follows the WA Government’s move to send executives from its property developer, Landcorp, to Sydney and Melbourne to find property heavyweights interested in investing in the state’s mining regions.

Landcorp said there was a shortage of industrial property in mining regions such as Newman, Port Hedland, and Karratha to support expanding mining operations.

It said while it was working on solving the problem it needed private entities to invest in property development in mining regions as well.

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