Mining states perform five times better

Sales growth in mining states Western Australia, Queensland, and the Northern Territory is over five times higher than the rest of Australia, according to the Bureau of Statistics.

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Sales growth in mining states Western Australia, Queensland, and the Northern Territory is over five times higher than the rest of Australia, according to the Bureau of Statistics.

The new business indicators report from the ABS released tomorrow is expected to show mining states continuing to outperform other parts of Australia in key economic indicators.

According to The Sydney Morning Herald sales growth for the year to December was 14.6 per cent in QLD, the NT, and WA.

In the rest of the country the figure reached only 2.9 per cent.

Wage growth was also much higher in mining regions, at 10.9 per cent in north-west mining states compared to just 5 per cent in the south-east.

The report is the latest of a long line of economic indicators showing the growing divide between the mining and non-mining regions of Australia.

A report released by CommSec last month said mining workers were the "winners" of Australia’s economy with their wages fast outstripping other workers.

CommSec said demand from mining states continued to "outpace supply" and workers in the industry earned close to $114,000 a year on average.

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