Mining slow to energy efficiency

THE mining and metals sector has been alarmingly slow to adopt sustained energy management practices with 42.9% of companies still not having implemented an official energy policy, according to a new whitepaper by Proudfoot Consulting.

THE mining and metals sector has been alarmingly slow to adopt sustained energy management practices with 42.9% of companies still not having implemented an official energy policy, according to a new whitepaper by Proudfoot Consulting.

Titled, Meeting the Corporate Energy Challenge: Are Companies Walking the Talk on Energy Efficiency? the whitepaper further reports that of the mining companies surveyed: 52.4% have only had an energy policy in place for between 1-5 years – only 4.8% have had a policy in place for more than 15 years; 38.1% do not have a designated person responsible for energy; and 38.1% have no dedicated energy team with specific energy goals.

The data also suggests that the responsibility of energy costs lies with middle management, mainly Department Managers (38.1%) and Accounts Payable (28.6%).

However, the mining industry does stand out from other sectors when it comes to energy usage tracking, with 76.2% of companies measuring, monitoring and reporting on energy KPIs.

Dr Gavin Lind, Senior Lecturer in Mining Engineering at the Western Australia School of Mines welcomes Proudfoot’s initiative in assessing the status of energy management in Australian and New Zealand companies, particularly in the mining and metals sector.

“The report indicates that companies in the mining and metals sector are committed to conducting business smarter — both financially and environmentally,” said Dr Lind.

“However, the challenge remains to translate corporate energy reduction initiatives into accountable outcomes at all levels within individual organisations”.

Mark Bagster, Vice President Mining, Proudfoot Consulting, says the survey data demonstrates that mining and metal companies have only in recent years begun to address the issue of energy efficiency and there is still a long way to go.

“Whilst energy intensive industries such as mining and metals have some activities and processes to control and reduce energy, they lack consistency in follow up and accountability.”

He believes that the responsibility of energy needs to be elevated to a senior management level.

“Accountability of energy at the correct management level would see reduction targets achieved and energy costs reduced”.

For more information, or to receive a copy of the whitepaper email Gemma Manning at gmanning@proudfootconsulting.com.

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