Mining professionals are selective: Hays Report

Multiple employment offers have led to candidates becoming far more selective in the vacancies considered, according to trends revealed in the latest Hays Quarterly Report.

Multiple employment offers have led to candidates becoming far more selective in the vacancies considered, according to trends revealed in the latest Hays Quarterly Report.

“Candidates have numerous opportunities available to them and so have become much more selective in the positions they will consider and accept,” Regional Director of Hays Resources & Mining Simon Winfield said.

“They will thoroughly research an organisation’s opportunities and culture before deciding to submit an application or accept any role.

“This means employers need to present their opportunity in the best possible light, throughout all stages of the recruitment process, and move quickly to secure their ideal candidate before they receive another offer.

“In addition, if an offer does not match the candidate’s expectation, whether that be in terms of salary, benefits or career progression opportunities, they will opt to either stay in their current role or accept another offer that does meet expectations.”

In other trends, the Hays Quarterly Report reveals the resources and mining recruitment market maintains its activity, with no signs of any overall slowing of recruitment needs.

“Most companies, whether direct mine owners or engineering consultancies, have extremely positive hiring intentions, both permanent and temporary, for the coming quarter. New exploration projects and mine expansions in particular will drive demand. In general, there is just as much work coming through now as there has been in the last 12 months,” Winfield said.

According to the Hays report, there are several hotspots that are under extreme pressure due to the level of demand for the skills.

Mining engineers are a prime area of candidate demand since mining companies continue to increase production while mine development and planning engineers are also required as smaller projects begin to enter the production phase.

Construction engineers (civil, mechanical, electrical) are needed due to a huge volume of heavy industrial construction, while safety managers, diesel fitters and geotechnical engineers are also in demand.

Electrical and mechanical maintenance trades are another hotspot, yet there is a general shortage of candidates due to major expansion works and construction employers offering higher contract rates in order to attract candidates.

In Western Australia there is a high level of demand for geologists while the expansion of mines in the Northern Territory to meet demand has also created a need for mine geologists.

South Australia needs exploration and project geologists due to the huge levels of spending and investment in the exploration of various tenements.

Further details available at www.hays.com.au/forecast

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