Mining industry should “lift its game” in training: Collier

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WA Training and Workforce Development Minister Peter Collier says the mining industry needs to "lift its game" in training inexperienced workers for mining jobs.

According to The West Australian Collier blamed the mining industry for his broken promise to have 47,100 west Australians in apprenticeships by 2012.

Collier said the mining and petroleum industry’s proportion of workers in training was low compared to other industries.

According to The West Australian he said 4.3 per cent of mining workers were in training, compared to six per cent in the construction industry and 6.2 per cent in manufacturing.

"They can bang on about skills shortages all they like but if they are sitting there with one of the lowest percentages of traineeships and apprentices in the industry groups then they need to lift their game," he said.

Earlier this week the WA CFMEU secretary Gary Wood also criticised mining companies for their commitment to training.

His comments came following news of Rio Tinto’s $483 million plan to introduce driverless trains to the Pilbara.

"If you want to talk about the skills shortage then let’s call a spade a spade," he said.

"Many Australians would love a chance to work in the mining industry, so it’s a fallacy to say there are not enough workers out there."

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