Mining grads as valuable as medicine students

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Mining engineering students are now as much in demand as medicine graduates according to Graduates Careers Australia’s annual employment data.

According to the new report one in four graduates finds it hard to get a full-time job after finishing their degree, with those geared towards the resources industry among those faring the best.

Mining engineering graduates were almost fully employed, with 98.2 per cent finding work in the first half of 2011.

They joined most medicine (98 per cent) and pharmacy (97.3 per cent) students as the graduates most in demand.

Overall 76.6 per cent of 2010 graduates found work by May 2011, a small increase from the 76.2 per cent recorded the year before.

The figures follow an announcement by Western Australia’s Chamber of Minerals and Energy that a new scholarship program will help increase access to mining management positions for Aboriginal people.

The scholarships will be awarded every year to four Indigenous workers already employed in the mining industry, and provide workers with a nationally accredited certificate in management.

CME director Nicole Rocke said there was a “high number of people required in the future years” for the mining industry, and the scholarship would help Aboriginal people fill the positions.

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