Miners face explosions, acid sprays, gassings

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Acid sprays, gassings, venomous snakes, and lightning strikes are just some of the risks faced by Queensland miners atop the threat of mine collapse and violent explosions.

According to APN News Queensland Department of Mines data showed more than 1000 "serious accidents or high potential incidents" had occurred from August 2011 to January 2012.

According to a 2011 report on mine safety in Queensland incidents on the state’s mines have been decreasing but serious accidents are still occurring.

APN News reports there were 505 workers left with a disability for 2011 and three killed at work.

Snake bites, shrapnel wounds, head injuries, and minor explosions were all reported, as well as a number of near misses.

The CFMEU has used safety concerns as a key flashpoint for continuing industrial action on BMA’s QLD mines.

Last week fresh negotiations between BMA and the union broke down, which resulted in a new wave of strikes.

The stoppages have made a significant dent in BMA’s earnings, with the company yesterday declaring force majeure on its contracts, blaming employee strikes and bad weather for not being able to meet supply.

Image: ABC News