Lynas website hacked as thousands protest

Lynas Corporation continues to struggle with its rare earths plans after its website was hacked and thousands joined fresh demonstrations in Malaysia on the weekend.

Normal
0

false
false
false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

Lynas Corporation continues to struggle with its rare earths plans after its website was hacked and thousands joined fresh demonstrations in Malaysia on the weekend.

According to The Australian reports of protestor numbers varied from 5,000 to the 20,000 reported by Save Malaysia Stop Lynas.

In a statement over the weekend SMSL said the campaign against the company had "escalated into the biggest ever environmental issue" for Malaysia.

“Today marks the beginning of a nation-wide campaign to stop the Lynas rare earth project," said Mr Wong Tack, a key organiser of the protest. 

"Malaysians have made our stand and we do not want this hazardous project on our shore.”

According to The Sydney Morning Herald a hacker using the name "4z1" has also taken credit for taking down the Lynas website.

This morning (Eastern Standard Time) the company site remains offline.

"We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties at the moment," it says.

"We apologise for any inconvenience caused."

Protestors have also launched legal action against the company in an attempt to overturn a temporary operating licence it was granted by the Malaysian Government.

Lynas previously said there was no basis to the legal claims and it would "vigorously protect its interests" in court.

Protestors fear the Lynas Advanced Materials Plant in Malaysia, used to process rare earths from its Mt Weld mine in Western Australia, is a threat to the environment and their health.

Lynas has repeatedly assured the community the plant is safe, and says it has complied with strict Government and international regulation.

While the Lynas woes continue United States-based rare earths competitor Molycorp this week announced the start-up of its rare earth manufacturing facility.

To keep up to date with Australian Mining, subscribe to our free email newsletters delivered straight to your inbox. Click here.