Joint study to prevent accidents

A US researcher will work with the Queensland Government in a study into how changing human behaviour could help prevent accidents in the state’s mining and quarrying industries.

A US researcher will work with the Queensland Government in a study into how changing human behaviour could help prevent accidents in the state’s mining and quarrying industries.

Mines and Energy Minister Geoff Wilson said the study, between the Queensland Mines Inspectorate and Clemson University in South Carolina, would investigate ways to help prevent fatal accidents.

“The mining industry is inherently a dangerous industry and safety must remain our number one priority,” Wilson said.

“The State Government has taken a number of significant steps to improve safety and health, but we can’t do it alone. Those responsible must fully play their part,” he said.

“We have the best mine safety legislation in Australia and it must continue to be enforced from the ground up – mine by mine, employer by employer, worker by worker,” Wilson said.

Dr Scott Shappell, Professor of Industrial Engineering at Clemson University, and a world expert in human behaviour factors, systems safety, error management and accident investigation will supervise the 12-month study.

Jessica Patterson, one of Dr Shappell’s PhD students, will conduct the on-ground research in Queensland mines.

Their objective is to study accidents involving workers coming into contact with machinery or vehicles and to develop interventions which can be applied to help prevent such accidents.

Patterson will visit mines sites across the state and work with the Safety in Mines Testing and Research Station (SIMTARS) and regional departmental offices.

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