Japanese mining solutions

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The Japanese may be the next big contributors to developments for the mining industry, with groundbreaking developments that can be used to find and reach resources.

The All-National Hole Digging Competition, held in Tokyo this month showcased the best the nation has to offer, with more than 200 teams competing for the coveted Golden Shovel award.

A number of all-female teams and squads of schoolchildren joined professional hold-diggers, including road maintenance crews and gas company employees to dig the deepest hole possible.

In front of more than a thousand fans, teams were given 30 minutes to complete the task.

The competing teams might have some tips for our own mining industry, as extra points were awarded for the “most creative hole”.

Naturally, many Australian mine workers would no doubt also want to emulate the work wear worn by the Japanese diggers, with extra points awarded for most original costume.

But the competition was not all fun and games; all shovels were measured to ensure they met width regulations and any team found to be putting earth back into a competitor’s hole was disqualified.

The winning team were able to produce a 3.26 metre deep hole in the half hour time limit and took home Y100 000 ($AU1194.25), but more importantly, the Golden Shovel.

Image: The Weather Network

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