Industry funds air-quality testing for Newcastle

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The mining industry is set to fund the development of an air-quality monitoring network for Newcastle.

The network will be designed to monitor air particulates and possibly nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide levels.

There will also be temporary monitoring stations for ammonia, and the measures will work together with current site-based testing.

According to the Newcastle Herald the Office of Environment and Heritage said the results from the network would be publicly available on the internet.

Stockton and Mayfield are currently being assessed as locations for new monitoring stations for the network.

According to the Herald Newcastle mayor John Tate said community involvement would be an important part of the project.

He said the network’s proposal was a good idea and would help residents understand if they faced potential health hazards.

He said he did not want to see the development of a “false sense of security” in regard to Newcastle’s air quality.

Tate also said the project had the potential for local schools to get involved and help with the monitoring.

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