Hazer posts battery-ready performance from graphite testing

Image: Hazer Group

Perth-based graphite company Hazer Group, which made waves late last year following a high-profile, clean fuel production deal with Mineral Resources, has announced positive test results from recovered graphite samples.

The company announced today that its non-optimised high purity graphite samples had exhibited performance comparable to fully optimised commercial graphite benchmarks in half-cell, lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries.

Hazer 99 per cent purity graphite was shown to have achieved no loss in capacity over 150 cycles, while 99.5 per cent purity graphite exhibited “strong performance” against graphite that had been optimised for Li-ion battery applications.

Hazer’s acting chief executive officer, Mark Edwards, was naturally pleased with the test work.

“These results are very encouraging considering we haven’t treated the Hazer graphite other than primary purification,” he said. “We can maintain stability without having to apply coatings like some of the benchmark materials we tested.”

Hazer has said that its graphite requires only one processing stage to become Li-ion battery ready, with process by-product being purified in one step; current natural and synthetic alternatives can require five to seven stages.

For example, natural graphite can require flake mining, crushing and grinding, flotation, milling, spheroidisation (heat treatment), purification and final coating to become battery ready, according to the company. The simplified process inherent to the Hazer process could potentially result in improved carbon footprint and economics.

“It is the simplicity of the Hazer process that gives it an edge over its competitors,” said Hazer chief technical officer Andrew Cornejo.

“Hazer graphite requires [fewer] stages of post-processing in comparison to the commercial alternatives because of the ability to tailor the ‘raw’ graphite to better suit the end application.”