Filmmakers ridicule Lynas rare earth plans

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Lynas Corporation’s rare earth plans in Malaysia have been ridiculed in a spate of satirical short films by local directors.

The most popular, titled Welcome to the Radioactive Village, depicts a post-apocalyptic world with cat-sized cows and mutated humans, and has racked up over 20,000 views in ten days.

The 14-minute clip imagines a comedic world where villages wrap themselves in bubble wrap and aluminium foil to guard against “toxic mushroom rain”

In another titled Love Dish, which has garnered over 26,000 hits in a month, portrays a tongue-in-cheek cooking show where a woman cooks contaminated blue carrots.

The cook is played by a Malaysian opposition MP at the forefront of the anti-Lynas movement.

Lynas is facing significant local opposition to its plans to build the Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) in Kuantan, Malaysia.

The plant is slated to be the minerals processing destination for rare earths mined by Lynas at Mt Weld in Western Australia.

Leading the battle against the plant is the Save Malaysia Stop Lynas action group, which previously told Australian Mining it was “highly unlikely” locals would allow the plant to operate.

Locals are primarily concerned about the potential for the plant’s low-level radioactive waste to damage the environment and their health, an issue played out in the short films.

But Lynas says its plant complies with industry standards and the International Atomic Energy Agency has issued a report approving the plant’s overall design.

The IAEA has issued Lynas with a set of recommendations for the plant and the company says it is committed to adopting them.

The LAMP was originally scheduled to start production in the third quarter of 2011, but Lynas says it will now commence early next year.

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