Explosion kills 28 miners

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A gas explosion at a coal mine in central China has killed 28 miners and left another trapped.

According to the Xinhua news agency 35 people were working in the mine at the time of the blast on Saturday.

Six miners have been rescued and are now being treated in hospital, with rescue workers still searching for survivors.

The blast occurred at the Xialiuching coal mine in Hengyang city, Hunan province.

The accident follows a roof collapse at the UK Kellingley Colliery late last month, which killed one miner and injured another.

The accident was not the first death at the UK Coal run colliery, where a miner was killed in 2008 and in 2009.

Also last month four coal miners died after they were trapped underground in a flooded Welsh coal mine.

The most recent accident is the latest for China’s notoriously unsafe mining industry.

According to AAP at least 19 people were killed earlier this month in China following similar gas explosions at two other mines.

In 2010 2433 people died in coal mining accidents in China, which levelled at a death rate of six workers per day.

But labour rights groups say China’s mine fatalities are most likely much higher than the official records.

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