Dead bodies put off Pike River buyers

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While a number of miners are interested in acquiring New Zealand’s Pike River Coal mine, the possibility of strict safety measures and recovering dead miners has put off some investors.

PricewaterhouseCoopers told Radio New Zealand buyers would probably be offering a small upfront payment for the mine, with larger payments coming after certain conditions were met.

PwC said the New Zealand Royal Commission into the Pike River disaster may still demand tough new safety upgrades to the project.

According to Radio New Zealand buyers were also concerned about the unknown costs and problems of recovering the 29 bodies still inside the mine.

The investigation into Pike River is still recovering worrying stories about the facilities and mining practice of the operation prior to the disaster.

Last month news emerged that plastic bags had been used to cover the mine’s underground gas sensors, and explosives had been used improperly.

According to AAP part of Pike River’s sale will include efforts to establish a trust to supervise the recovery of the dead miners inside.

The Pike River inquiry is due to resume next month.

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