Coal seam gas ban divides community

Normal
0

false
false
false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0cm;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

The NSW Government’s decision to extend for the second time a coal seam gas moratorium has drawn mixed reactions from the industry and community.

The ban on fracking, due to end on December 31, has been extended until April 2012 to allow more time for an independent review to investigate the process.

Barrington Gloucester Stroud Preservation Alliance spokesperson Gary Smith told the ABC while the group welcomed the move there was little mining activity completed over the Christmas period.

"There’s not going to be a lot of activity in January, February and I feel longer would be desirable, but yes it is good,” he said.

According to the ABC Smith said the impact of CSG on the environment was still not well understood.

A Dart Energy spokesperson told The Financial Review it was unconcerned about the fracking ban.

It said other technologies could be employed to achieve the same results.

“Dart has no plans to frac anyway. Our preferred position is horizontal well technology, which precludes the need to fracking,” they said.

Last week a long awaited senate inquiry made damning findings against CSG, and proposed moves to slow the industry’s advancement.

Image: AAP

To keep up to date with Australian Mining, subscribe to our free email newsletters delivered straight to your inbox. Click here.