Biggest cheers for carbon tax are from competitors: QRC

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The passage of the carbon tax through the lower house yesterday will come as good news to Australia’s mining competitors, according to Queensland Resources Council chief executive Michael Roche.

Scenes of joy erupted from Labour ranks in parliament yesterday as the carbon tax was passed.

Praise for the tax came from abroad as well, with The Atlantic magazine naming Prime Minister Julia Gillard as one of its 2011 "brave thinkers" for her strength in passing the policy.

But in a statement yesterday Roche said the biggest cheers for the carbon tax vote would come from overseas industry competitors.

“The hugs and backslapping in Canberra this morning are nothing compared with the level of excitement that this tax on Australia’s key export industries is generating among our global competitors,” he said.

“Resource exporters in Canada, the United States, Indonesia, Africa, and South America must be delighted that Australian MPs have voted to hand over a large chunk of the Australian resource sector’s future growth and with it, thousands of jobs.”

The Government has previously denied claims putting a price on carbon would hurt Australian businesses.

It says most emissions-intensive and trade-exposed businesses will receive assistance to cover 94.5 per cent of carbon costs in the first year of a carbon price.

It also says its $1.3 billion Coal Sector Jobs Package will provide specific support for the coal industry to support jobs and communities.