Anglo American worker faces drug charges

A former Anglo American coal worker has pleaded guilty to drug possession after being found with 109 ecstasy tablets.

Normal
0

false
false
false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

st1:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) }

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-ansi-language:#0400;
mso-fareast-language:#0400;
mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

A former Anglo American coal worker has pleaded guilty to drug possession after being found with 109 ecstasy tablets.

According to The Morning Bulletin police found the ecstasy tablets, 500 clip-seal bags, two vials of testosterone, a drug-testing kit, and a set of scales in the Leighton Cowley’s caravan.

Cowley initially told police the scales were for cooking, but there were no other cooking utensils in the caravan.

Crown prosecutor Michael Cowen said while the clip-bags and scales were not subject to charges, their presence could assert commercial ambitions.

The Morning Bulletin reports that Cowley initially refuted claims of commerciality, but did not deny it after the judge said the claim would be used to determine his sentencing.

In 2008 Cowley was sentenced to two years jail with an immediate release and $5,000 in fines for possession and supply of dangerous drugs.

According to The Morning Bulletin Cowley was employed by Anglo American at the Drayton coal mine in the Hunter Valley.

Anglo American did not return Australian Mining’s calls this morning.

Cowley was sentenced to 12 months jail to be suspended after two months.

Last year the synthetic cannabis product Kronic was banned after it was found its use was widespread on Australian mining sites.

And earlier this year the body-building supplement Jack3d was banned at a Bowen Basin mine following reports workers were using it to stay awake.

To keep up to date with Australian Mining, subscribe to our free email newsletters delivered straight to your inbox. Click here.