3D cameras offer a Deep Vision

Deep Vision 3D will commercialise a new three-dimensional video camera that can be used in hostile underground mining environments.

Curtin University of Technology has established a company, Deep Vision 3D, with the aim of commercialising a new three-dimensional video camera that can be used in hostile underground mining environments.

According to Curtin, the company will promote two models of the stereoscopic mini-cameras; one for use in mining and the other for subsea inspection use in the oil and gas industry.

In trials to date, the camera has realistic depth perception when using remotely controlled equipment in hostile environments, the University said.

The cameras were developed at Curtin’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology by research fellow Andrew Woods.

According to Woods, the systems can determine object size and depth more accurately than existing two-dimensional cameras.

“Previous attempts at enabling 3D video camera systems have not been successful due to issues of cameras losing critical alignment, and user eye-fatigue,” he said.

“Our camera design is capable of addressing these problems.”

The company will initially focus on deploying the technology, but will also conduct research and development to design new generations of the cameras.

Curtin’s IP commercialisation director Rohan McDougall said the University had provided seed investment in the company and will remain a shareholder while it establishes itself.

“The company has tremendous potential to succeed, by offering a key enabling technology in strategic industries, with expected demand for the cameras likely to be strong,” he said.

Deep Vision 3D was a recent recipient of the Federal Government’s Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) grant.

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